Choose the language.
Tkart magazine

The Expert Advices | Getting the most out of your tyres with the help of telemetry

Exclusive Content

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR TYRES WITH THE HELP OF TELEMETRY

29 October 2017
alt

Everybody knows that new tyres get better performance thanks to the better grip the compound provides. Smart drivers are those able to get the most out of them, finding that extra potential which, after the warm-up phase (which varies according to compound, brand …) doesn’t last long before wear begins.
Telemetry is a fundamental ally for optimal tyre management, a key aspect in doing as well as possible in qualifying. By comparing data from the same driver’s best lap with both used tyres and new tyres, for example, you can see whether the latter truly did make a difference. Additionally, you can evaluate if the better time achieved with new tyres actually came at the moment of the tyres’ maximum potential.

1 Is there a way to see immediately if the driver has exploited the new tyres?

A simply way to get a general impression is to analyse the G-G diagram from two laps: one with new tyres and one with used tyres. Lateral acceleration is registered on the y-axis, longitudinal acceleration on the x-axis. Theoretically, you should expect to see, in all four quadrants of the diagram, the dots relative to the lap with new tyres further to the outside than the dots from the lap with used tyres, indicating that the driver exploited the new tyres both in accelerating and in braking.

SMART DRIVERS ARE ABLE TO EXPLOIT THE POTENTIAL OF NEW TYRES AT THE RIGHT TIME, BEFORE THEY BEGIN TO WEAR DOWN
SPEED PROFILES

2 Do different tyres also condition driving style?

Certainly. There’s a recurring situation in which, for karts with the same setup, the use of new tyres generates a different balancing of the vehicle, for example by changing the degree of under/oversteering, or by making the kart less nervous and thus require fewer corrections by the driver, typical of a situation with better grip.

The signal dynamics data, that is, the index proportional to the amount of corrections the driver makes (the more corrections, the higher the number), is significant. In our case, we see how the values registered with used tyres vary greatly between one lap and another. With new tyres, however, steering dynamics are more consistent between the various laps, meaning a more uniform use of the steering wheel and, therefore, a similar amount of corrections lap after lap.

Continue reading the article by subscribing for only € 0.96 / week