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Under Review | Modena Engines KK2, the new KZ engine with 2019 homologation

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MODENA ENGINES KK2, THE NEW KZ ENGINE WITH 2019 HOMOLOGATION

01 April 2019







2T

TYPE
Like most kart engines on the market, the RKZ is a 2-S. 4-stroke engines are still a small niche

125 cc

DISPLACEMENT
125 cc. Is now the standard cylinder capacity. 100 engines are a thing of the past.

A SPINTA

START
Push-mode as in all KZ engines, with hand-release clutch and neutral to 2nd gear shifting

GEARBOX

TRANSMISSION
The RKZ belongs to the gearbox “family” of karting engines. It has a 6 gear manual transmission

KZ

HOMOLOGATION
It is the shifter KZ, valid from 2019 to 2021.

KZ engines have always been the focus at Modena Engines. The 2019 homologation, despite the novelty of the presentation of the ME-KJ and ME-K non-shifter engines, is further confirmation of this with the new KK2 shifter engine.

The new model presented by Modena Engines for the shifter categories introduces a series of changes with respect to the past:  gear ratios, cylinder tilt, crankshaft and connecting rod… The goal, certainly not new to the Italian manufacturer, is to facilitate engine management and preparation for its customers, those drivers who aren’t a part of official teams. From carburetion to the regulation of ignition angles, the updates implemented are extremely interesting.

The first modification we note is on the outside: the tilt of the engine with respect to the engine plate is now more vertical, allowing for better cooling and efficiency.
Moving to the aspiration pipe, the first important modification is found precisely in its structure: abandoning the V-Flow reed valve pack, which proved too complex to manage, the KK2 utilizes a more traditional solution, but one which entails bringing the rubber exhaust pipe 3 mm closer, thanks to modifications made to the support base. This solution is particularly helpful at medium speed ranges (between 9,000 and 10,000 rpm), making the engine respond more quickly and making for easier driving.

The modification, however, can be “removed” by inserting a 3 mm-thick aluminium plate beneath the pack. The conveyor is made from Nylon-loaded carbon fibre, a material more tolerant of extreme temperatures and chemical solvents. On this point the Modena Engines development department has invested greatly, exploiting the speed of 3-D printing to make prototypes for later track testing.

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